Pew Research Center

Oct 21

Do you trust the news?

Do you trust the news?

Romney (again) in 2016? That would be unusual, but not unprecedented

Romney (again) in 2016? That would be unusual, but not unprecedented

futurejournalismproject:

Conservatives, Liberals and the News
A new Pew Research study exploring US political polarization neatly captures what’s long been known: political partisans occupy filter bubbles with their own distinct set of news sources.
Some takeaways. "Consistent" conservatives:
Are tightly clustered around a single news source, far more than any other group in the survey, with 47% citing Fox News as their main source for news about government and politics.
Express greater distrust than trust of 24 of the 36 news sources measured in the survey. At the same time, fully 88% of consistent conservatives trust Fox News.
Are, when on Facebook, more likely than those in other ideological groups to hear political opinions that are in line with their own views.
Are more likely to have friends who share their own political views. Two-thirds (66%) say most of their close friends share their views on government and politics.
On the side of the spectrum, "consistent" liberals:
Are less unified in their media loyalty; they rely on a greater range of news outlets, including some – like NPR and the New York Times– that others use far less.
Express more trust than distrust of 28 of the 36 news outlets in the survey. NPR, PBS and the BBC are the most trusted news sources for consistent liberals.
Are more likely than those in other ideological groups to block or “defriend” someone on a social network – as well as to end a personal friendship – because of politics.
Are more likely to follow issue-based groups, rather than political parties or candidates, in their Facebook feeds.
Is there any common ground? Just a bit. Both consistent conservatives and consistent liberals follow governmental and political news more closely than other groups.
Pew identifies five ideological groups in the study: consistent liberals, mostly liberals, mixed, mostly conservatives and consistent conservatives. While those in the ideological middle expose themselves to the widest variety of information sources, they do not focus on politics as often as partisan news consumers which Pew reports is about 20% of the country.
Pew Research, Political Polarization & Media Habits.
Image: Primary news sources for liberals and conservatives, via Pew (PDF)

futurejournalismproject:

Conservatives, Liberals and the News

A new Pew Research study exploring US political polarization neatly captures what’s long been known: political partisans occupy filter bubbles with their own distinct set of news sources.

Some takeaways. "Consistent" conservatives:

On the side of the spectrum, "consistent" liberals:

Is there any common ground? Just a bit. Both consistent conservatives and consistent liberals follow governmental and political news more closely than other groups.

Pew identifies five ideological groups in the study: consistent liberals, mostly liberals, mixed, mostly conservatives and consistent conservatives. While those in the ideological middle expose themselves to the widest variety of information sources, they do not focus on politics as often as partisan news consumers which Pew reports is about 20% of the country.

Pew Research, Political Polarization & Media Habits.

Image: Primary news sources for liberals and conservatives, via Pew (PDF)

Debate over inequality highlights sharp partisan divisions on the issue

Debate over inequality highlights sharp partisan divisions on the issue

Oct 20

What’s the greatest threat to the world?

What’s the greatest threat to the world?

Young U.S. Catholics overwhelmingly accepting of homosexuality -

People in developing and emerging markets (medians of 56%) are somewhat more likely to believe their fate is out of their hands than those in advanced economies (51%).

People in developing and emerging markets (medians of 56%) are somewhat more likely to believe their fate is out of their hands than those in advanced economies (51%).

Oct 18

Are you a student borrower?

Are you a student borrower?

Oct 17

“In 32 of the 44 countries we surveyed, men are significantly more likely than women to say gender is very important to getting ahead. The gender gap on this issue tends to be larger in the emerging and developing economies surveyed.” — Global economics - what does the world think?

Student debt has increased dramatically over the past several decades. The aggregate volume of new student borrowing has increased more than fourfold over the past 20 years.

Student debt has increased dramatically over the past several decades. The aggregate volume of new student borrowing has increased more than fourfold over the past 20 years.

What’s most important for getting ahead?

What’s most important for getting ahead?

Oct 16

Anonymous said: Summer internship 2015- I'm a graduate student in sociology in my second year. Are there any internship positions opening for summer 2015? What are the criterion for applying and what is the procedure?

Hello!

We don’t have any internships currently posted, but typically in the summer we do offer several internships in different areas. We’ll post those listings in early 2015 — keep checking back here.

“In 2012, a record share of the nation’s new college graduates (69%) had taken out student loans to finance their education, and the typical amount they had borrowed was more than twice that of college graduates 20 years ago.” — The share of affluent students who take out student loans has doubled.

Perhaps because most publics see a bright future for their nation’s youth, people in emerging and developing nations generally believe that it is better for young people who want to have a good life to stay in their home country, rather than move to another country.

Perhaps because most publics see a bright future for their nation’s youth, people in emerging and developing nations generally believe that it is better for young people who want to have a good life to stay in their home country, rather than move to another country.

Oct 15

Despite the long-term optimism that exists in many countries, there are widespread concerns about inequality. Majorities in all of the 44 nations we polled say the gap between rich and poor is a big problem facing their countries, and majorities in 28 nations identify this as a very big problem. 

Despite the long-term optimism that exists in many countries, there are widespread concerns about inequality. Majorities in all of the 44 nations we polled say the gap between rich and poor is a big problem facing their countries, and majorities in 28 nations identify this as a very big problem.