Thursday marks one year since Pope Francis was elected to the papacy. There’s little question that, after a year, he’s extremely popular – at least in the United States, where the pope is seen favorably by the vast majority of Catholics and even 60% of non-Catholics. 
Many Catholics would like to see changes on specific church teachings. We’ve dug into the data over on Fact Tank.

Thursday marks one year since Pope Francis was elected to the papacy. There’s little question that, after a year, he’s extremely popular – at least in the United States, where the pope is seen favorably by the vast majority of Catholics and even 60% of non-Catholics. 

Many Catholics would like to see changes on specific church teachings. We’ve dug into the data over on Fact Tank.

How U.S. tech-sector jobs have grown, changed in 15 years

YOUR TURN AGAIN:

pewinternet:

Yesterday, we discussed the potential future of the Web. Today, share with us your earliest memories of the Web. Use this timeline as a guide: http://pewrsr.ch/1nH2Ch9

And this image of the world’s first cellphone with internet capabilities as inspiration (1996): 

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What are some of your favorite memories and milestones?

Washington Post: Why the political fight over same sex marriage is over, in 1 chart
The changing face of America.

The changing face of America.

Generations typically span about 20 years, so as Millennials age, the spotlight may shift to the youngest Americans. On the Daily Show on Monday, the conversation turned to this post-Millennial generation — who they are and what they could be called. 

Jon Stewart: “Is there a generation beneath the Millennials? Is there another one?”

Paul Taylor: ”If you can name the generation beneath the Millennials, I will take you out to lunch, because usually it’s magazine cover writers who figure that out.”

Jon Stewart: “You just opened up a contest, my friend.”

We’re collecting suggestions now on Fact Tank. What would you call this youngest generation of Americans?

On cell phone usage, there is still a significant generation gap.

On cell phone usage, there is still a significant generation gap.

pewinternet:

We’ve been talking about the future of the internet all day here at Pew Internet; so we’re taking a break now and strolling down memory lane.

History of the World Wide Web: A timeline

We’ve captured both the major milestones and small moments that have shaped the Web since 1989. It is a living document that we will update with your contributions. To suggest an item to add to the timeline, please message us. And of course, continue to follow the entire #web25 conversation here: http://www.pewinternet.org/web25

policymic:

6 key findings from Pew’s research on millennials

1. We’re independent and not very religious

Pew found that 50% of Millennials consider themselves independents, as opposed to 39% of Gen X, 37% of Boomers and 32% of the Silent Generation. And 29% consider themselves religiously unaffiliated, up from 21% of Gen X, 16% of Boomers and just 9% of the Silent Generation.

Read the restFollow policymic

By a roughly two-to-one margin (56% vs. 29%), the public says it is more important for the U.S. to not get involved in the situation with Russia and Ukraine than to take a firm stand against Russian actions.
Read more.

By a roughly two-to-one margin (56% vs. 29%), the public says it is more important for the U.S. to not get involved in the situation with Russia and Ukraine than to take a firm stand against Russian actions.

Read more.

YOUR TURN: What are your predictions for the future of the internet?

pewinternet:

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We asked 2,558 experts and technology builders about what digital life will look like in 2025. They predict the Internet will become ‘like electricity’ — less visible, yet more deeply embedded in people’s lives for good and ill.

TELL US: What are your own predictions for the future of the internet?

Today, 61% of Republicans and Republican leaners under 30 favor same-sex marriage while just 35% oppose it.