"A record 57 million Americans, or 18.1% of the population of the United States, lived in multi-generational family households in 2012, double the number who lived in such households in 1980."

Do you live in a multigenerational household?

What the public thinks about immigration. 
U.S. evangelical Christians are chilly toward atheists – and the feeling is mutual
Obama gets much higher marks than his predecessor for empathy and honesty. But his ratings on leadership and his ability to get things done are about the same as Bush’s at about this point in his second term.

Obama gets much higher marks than his predecessor for empathy and honesty. But his ratings on leadership and his ability to get things done are about the same as Bush’s at about this point in his second term.

Dating back to the late 1970s, the partisan gap in Mideast sympathies has never been wider.

Dating back to the late 1970s, the partisan gap in Mideast sympathies has never been wider.

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Four states account for half of the nation’s wiretapping activity, according to a new report from the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts. 
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Four states account for half of the nation’s wiretapping activity, according to a new report from the Administrative Office of U.S. Courts. 

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The demographics and politics of gun-owning households
"20% of Hispanics say there is a gun in their home. Among whites, 41% say the same."

Where are the guns in America?

How North Dakota’s ‘man rush’ compares with past population booms
Jews, Catholics and evangelical Christians are viewed warmly by the American public. When asked to rate each group on a “feeling thermometer” ranging from 0 to 100 – where 0 reflects the coldest, most negative possible rating and 100 the warmest, most positive rating – all three groups receive an average rating of 60 or higher (63 for Jews, 62 for Catholics and 61 for evangelical Christians). And 44% of the public rates all three groups in the warmest part of the scale (67 or higher).

Jews, Catholics and evangelical Christians are viewed warmly by the American public. When asked to rate each group on a “feeling thermometer” ranging from 0 to 100 – where 0 reflects the coldest, most negative possible rating and 100 the warmest, most positive rating – all three groups receive an average rating of 60 or higher (63 for Jews, 62 for Catholics and 61 for evangelical Christians). And 44% of the public rates all three groups in the warmest part of the scale (67 or higher).

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Who likes the U.S. — and who doesn’t