Dig into our report on unauthorized immigrants in America.
About four-in-ten of those younger than 30 (43%) say there are plenty of jobs in their local communities, but just 27% say good jobs are plentiful. Among older age groups, there is less of a disparity in views of the availability of jobs generally and good jobs.

About four-in-ten of those younger than 30 (43%) say there are plenty of jobs in their local communities, but just 27% say good jobs are plentiful. Among older age groups, there is less of a disparity in views of the availability of jobs generally and good jobs.

Read more.
"Nearly half (48%) of Americans say the U.S. is less important and powerful as a world leader than a decade ago while 34% believe it remains as important."

5 takeaways on how Americans view a world in crisis

"The United Arab Emirates has the highest share of foreign-born people (84% of its population). The United Kingdom is home to the most diverse immigrant community in the world."

…and more facts about global migration, compiled by Fact Tank.

Do you feel financially secure?
Based on recent media reports, many people may think that, because of the tough economy and stagnant wage growth, more and more people are working multiple jobs. You may have read that more Americans are moonlighting with a part-time night shift at Target, selling homemade jam at farmers’ markets on the weekend, or cobbling together two, three or more part-time jobs to approximate a living income.
However, that assumption would be wrong. 

Based on recent media reports, many people may think that, because of the tough economy and stagnant wage growth, more and more people are working multiple jobs. You may have read that more Americans are moonlighting with a part-time night shift at Target, selling homemade jam at farmers’ markets on the weekend, or cobbling together two, three or more part-time jobs to approximate a living income.

However, that assumption would be wrong. 

"Today, 39% of Americans say the U.S. is doing too much to solve world problems, a drop from the 51% who said the same last November."

5 takeaways on how Americans view a world in crisis

Dig into our latest report on unauthorized immigrants.
Jobs, the economy and personal finance: what Americans think.
Religious divides persist heading into fall campaign

Everyone but millennials are working fewer jobs

thisisfusion:

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(Image credit: Pew Research Center)

As of July, only 4.6 percent of all employed people were working more than one job, according to a pewresearch study, which cited data from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

This is a significantly lower percentage than what it was during the 1980s and 1990s.

However, there is one group still working multiple jobs: millennials. 

More than five percent of people in their early 20s are likely to work more than one job, according to BLS data.

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(Image credit: Bureau of Labor Statistics)

In 2011, The New York Times profiled 26-year-old Roger Fierro, who had four jobs: “working as a bilingual-curriculum specialist for the textbook publisher Pearson; handling estate sales and online marketing for a store that sells vintage items; setting up an online store for a custom piñata maker; and developing reality-show ideas for a production company.”

As of June 25, 2011, Fierro, who had a degree in international studies and Latin American studies, had earned about $1,800 for the month, according to the Times. 

The Times also profiled a recent graduate who has to babysit five nights a week — in addition to her full-time job — and actress who who assists dance instructors and babysits to make ends meet.

Writing by Abby Rogers, Editing by Margarita Noriega

In advance of Friday’s jobs report, the public’s assessment of job availability in their local communities has improved modestly. But that has done nothing to boost overall economic optimism.

In advance of Friday’s jobs report, the public’s assessment of job availability in their local communities has improved modestly. But that has done nothing to boost overall economic optimism.

Among the nation’s 10.4 million unauthorized adults, a shrinking share have been in the country for less than five years—15% in 2012, compared with 38% in 2000. A rising share have lived in the U.S. for a decade or more—62% in 2012, compared with 35% in 2000. About a fifth (21%) had been in the U.S. for two decades or more as of 2012.

Among the nation’s 10.4 million unauthorized adults, a shrinking share have been in the country for less than five years—15% in 2012, compared with 38% in 2000. A rising share have lived in the U.S. for a decade or more—62% in 2012, compared with 35% in 2000. About a fifth (21%) had been in the U.S. for two decades or more as of 2012.