5 Facts About Hispanics

It’s National Hispanic Heritage Month. Our Hispanic Trends Project has a wealth of demographic data and analysis available for your perusing. In the meantime, check out 5 fast facts about Hispanics:

  1. Although there’s been some dispersion in recent years, the Hispanic population remains highly concentrated. More than half (55%) of the nation’s Hispanics live in just three states — California, Texas and Florida.
  2. The umbrella term “Hispanic” embraces a wide variety of backgrounds and cultures. However, nearly two-thirds of U.S. Hispanics trace their family origins to Mexico.
  3. A record 35 million (74%) Hispanics ages 5 and older speak Spanish at home.

Click through for more fast facts.

From our February study on second-generation immigrants in America.

From our February study on second-generation immigrants in America.

More See Immigrants as a Strength than a Burden

From our just released report. Read more.

"49% of Americans say immigrants strengthen the country because of their hard work and talents, while 41% say they are a burden because they take jobs, health care and housing. In a June 2010 poll, 39% said immigrants strengthened the country while 50% said they were a burden."

Most Say Illegal Immigrants Should Be Allowed to Stay, But Citizenship Is More Divisive

Katie Couric interviews Mark Lopez of the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Lopez: “The United States is actually the second-largest Hispanic nation, just behind Mexico. That means the U.S. has more Latinos than Peru or Colombia or Argentina…There’s beginning to be an identity that is unique to the U.S. that is a pan-Hispanic identity, but one that also highlights the many heritages that those in the U.S. have from all of Latin America.”

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

While Obama’s job ratings are up at least slightly among many demographic groups, one of the most striking turnarounds over the past year is in the views of Hispanics. Read more.

A statistical portrait of U.S. Hispanics: See our new slideshow on trends in Hispanic life here.

A statistical portrait of U.S. Hispanics: See our new slideshow on trends in Hispanic life here.

The Future of Libraries
A new report just released from the Pew Internet & American Life Project looks at what the future public library might look like: digital books? mobile apps? customized recommendations a la Netflix or Pandora?

Among other findings, the report looks at the demographics of library use: Compared to whites, African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely to say libraries are important to them and their families, to say libraries are important to their communities, to access the internet at the library (and feel internet access is a very important service libraries provide), to use library internet access to hunt/apply for jobs, and to visit libraries just to sit and read or study.

The Future of Libraries

A new report just released from the Pew Internet & American Life Project looks at what the future public library might look like: digital books? mobile apps? customized recommendations a la Netflix or Pandora?

Among other findings, the report looks at the demographics of library use: Compared to whites, African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely to say libraries are important to them and their families, to say libraries are important to their communities, to access the internet at the library (and feel internet access is a very important service libraries provide), to use library internet access to hunt/apply for jobs, and to visit libraries just to sit and read or study.

NPR: In Wake of Recession, Immigrant Births Plunge

Pew Research Center’s Gretchen Livingston talks with NPR’s Jennifer Ludden about a new survey report on the record-low birth rate in the U.S. — and the drastic decline in Latino immigrant fertility. 

Livingston: “Hispanics were the hardest hit in terms of employment.Their wealth declined by something like 66 percent during the recession. And also important, Hispanics perceive themselves as being extremely hard hit by the recession.”

Read the full report.

A majority (51%) of Hispanics say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.

A majority (51%) of Hispanics say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.