"In 2009, Fox surpassed CNN as the cable news outlet that spends the most money each year. In 2012, the channel was estimated by SNL Kagan to spend $820 million—on everything from salaries for on-air talent to maintaining bureaus and keeping the lights on. That spending was up 11% from 2011 levels, according to Kagan data. CNN was estimated to spend $682 million on news gathering in 2012, and MSNBC, which draws partially upon the resources of parent NBC News, $240 million."

5 Facts about Fox News

"60% of Fox News viewers describe themselves as conservative, compared with 23% who say they are moderate and 10% who are liberal. By contrast, the ideological makeup of CNN viewers (32% conservative, 30% moderate, 30% liberal) and MSNBC viewers (32% conservative, 23% moderate, 36% liberal) is far more mixed."

5 Facts About Fox News

New: Nearly one-in-ten U.S. adults (8%) get news through Twitter. 

 

New report: How Americans Get TV News at Home
In print, newspapers cut opinion:

“The trend over the last dozen years or so is that editorial departments have lost space and personnel,” said Bob Davis, associate publisher/editor of The Anniston (Ala.) Star, which has cut one opinion page per week. “People are looking at themselves less as being an editorial voice and more as being a stimulator of conversation.”

In print, newspapers cut opinion:

“The trend over the last dozen years or so is that editorial departments have lost space and personnel,” said Bob Davis, associate publisher/editor of The Anniston (Ala.) Star, which has cut one opinion page per week. “People are looking at themselves less as being an editorial voice and more as being a stimulator of conversation.”

Do you listen to news on the radio?

In the last presidential campaign, journalists were responsible for only 27% of the information that voters heard about the candidates — while nearly 50% came from the politicians themselves.

Who runs the news cycle? Who controls the flow of information? Watch this video for a 5-minut explanation of how the role of the press has changed. 

In 2012 LA Weekly surpassed the Village Voice to become the largest circulating alt-weekly in the U.S. Our State of the News Media website has more just-released numbers on circulation for newspapers and magazines here.

In 2012 LA Weekly surpassed the Village Voice to become the largest circulating alt-weekly in the U.S. Our State of the News Media website has more just-released numbers on circulation for newspapers and magazines here.

Have you heard about the news industry’s financial struggles?

If not, you’re in good company.

Where do you get your news?

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From a newspaper? Television? The radio? From a digital source, like social media or a news site? Perhaps all of the above.

In 2012, 39% of respondents got news online or from a mobile device “yesterday,” (the day before they participated in the survey) up from 34% in 2010.

Though “traditional” media may be declining as a primary source for news, online news has been on an incline since 2006. A further breakdown shows that 19% of respondents got news from social media and 16% did so from e-mail, while 8% said they’d listened to a podcast.

More digital developments from the State of the News Media report: http://pewrsr.ch/114ozuY

NPR Talk of the Nation: As Consumers Jump Ship, News Outlets Shift Priorities

(featuring Amy Mitchell, acting director, Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism)

Americans are abandoning their long-trusted news outlets in high numbers. According to a Pew Research Center report, 31 percent of Americans say they have deserted a particular news outlet because it no longer provides the information they want.

The New York Times’ take on this year’s State of the News Media report:

With shorter stories and scarce coverage of politics and government, local television newscasts in the United States, like local newspapers before them, are suffering from “shrinking pains,” according to thePew Research Center.

“This adds up to a news industry that is more undermanned and unprepared to uncover stories, dig deep into emerging ones or to question information put into its hands,” the report’s main author, Amy Mitchell, wrote in an introduction.