Both the U.S. and China get mixed reviews when publics in the region are asked how much each country considers the interests of their own nation, although, on balance, China fares somewhat better on this measure.

Both the U.S. and China get mixed reviews when publics in the region are asked how much each country considers the interests of their own nation, although, on balance, China fares somewhat better on this measure.

Our hot-off-the-presses report looks at views of China and the U.S. in 39 countries around the world. See how different countries view China and the U.S. and how China-U.S. relations are changing, including the following findings:
In 23 of 39 nations polled, majorities or pluralities say China either already has replaced or eventually will replace the U.S. as the top superpower. 
 In 28 of 38 nations, half or more of those surveyed express a favorable opinion of the U.S.
The highest favorability rating for the U.S. is in the Philippines, (85%), the lowest is Pakistan (11%).

Our hot-off-the-presses report looks at views of China and the U.S. in 39 countries around the world. See how different countries view China and the U.S. and how China-U.S. relations are changing, including the following findings:

  • In 23 of 39 nations polled, majorities or pluralities say China either already has replaced or eventually will replace the U.S. as the top superpower. 
  •  In 28 of 38 nations, half or more of those surveyed express a favorable opinion of the U.S.
  • The highest favorability rating for the U.S. is in the Philippines, (85%), the lowest is Pakistan (11%).
What people around the world think about their financial situation, according to our 2012 survey of global opinion.

What people around the world think about their financial situation, according to our 2012 survey of global opinion.

"Americans have somewhat hawkish views on China, and when asked which country represents the greatest danger to the U.S., more Americans volunteered China than name any other nation, including Iran and North Korea, in a recent Pew Research survey."

— Bruce Stokes, Director of Global Economic Attitudes, the Pew Research Center [CNN]

World Trends in 2012: A Slideshow by the Pew Research Center
Click through to see a slideshow of our biggest findings of the year around the world, including views on capitalism, democracy, drone strikes, religion and economic power.

World Trends in 2012: A Slideshow by the Pew Research Center


Click through to see a slideshow of our biggest findings of the year around the world, including views on capitalism, democracy, drone strikes, religion and economic power.

Growing Wary of Each Other - The U.S. China Relationship:  Over the past year, public opinion surveys in the United States and China have shown evidence of rising tensions between the two countries on issues, such as increasingly negative perceptions of each other and concern over economic and trade policies.

Growing Wary of Each Other - The U.S. China Relationship:  Over the past year, public opinion surveys in the United States and China have shown evidence of rising tensions between the two countries on issues, such as increasingly negative perceptions of each other and concern over economic and trade policies.

"There’s not a lot of support in China for how President Obama has handled global economic problems. He didn’t live up to expectations on the issue of climate change in China. So we know a little bit, although we don’t have a whole lot of specifics about what particular policies led to this change in attitudes. The slide in the Chinese perception of America reflects broader global trends, but is also steeper than in some other countries. We’ve seen a little bit of a downturn in America’s global image in a few spots around the world over the last few years. Some of the initial enthusiasm that greeted the election of President Obama has faded a little bit, but you see it particularly in China."

— Richard Wike, Pew Global Attitudes Project Associate Director, quoted in a U.S. News piece discussing a report released yesterday on growing concerns in China about inequality and corruption, but also the Chinese public’s increasing reservations over relations with the United States.  

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

Survey results released today by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project find that views about the economic balance of power have shifted dramatically from 2008-2012.  In 2008, a median of 45% named the U.S. as the world’s leading economic power, while just 22% said China. Today, only 36% say the U.S., while 42% believe China is in the top position. Read the full report.  


Survey results released today by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project find that views about the economic balance of power have shifted dramatically from 2008-2012.  In 2008, a median of 45% named the U.S. as the world’s leading economic power, while just 22% said China. Today, only 36% say the U.S., while 42% believe China is in the top position. Read the full report.  

Global Opinion of Obama Slips, International Policies Faulted
Drone Strikes Widely Opposed
Among the principal findings from a survey of more than 26,000 people in 21 countries conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project:   
Global approval of President Barack Obama’s international policies has declined significantly since he first took office, but overall confidence in him and attitudes toward the U.S. have slipped only modestly as a consequence, finds a new survey just released today of 21 countries by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project.
Key findings:
President Obama:  Europeans and Japanese remain largely confident in Obama, while Muslim publics remain largely critical.
Obama and Bush:  Obama consistently receives higher ratings than President Bush did in 2008, in Western Europe and Japan, but also in several predominantly Muslim nations.
Obama’s Policies:  Among the EU countries surveyed in both 2009 and 2012, a median of 78% approved of Obama’s policies in 2009, compared with 63% now. 
Obama’s Re-election:   Among the EU countries surveyed in both 2009 and 2012, a median of 78% approved of Obama’s policies in 2009, compared with 63% now.  In the Middle East there is little enthusiasm for a second term. 
United States:  Majorities or pluralities in 12 countries express a favorable opinion of the U.S., while the prevailing view is negative in only five nations.  The biggest improvements in America’s image have occurred among Europeans, but not in strategically important Muslim nations. 
China:  Today, only 36% say the U.S. is the world’s leading economic power, while 42% believe China is in the top position.  
Read the report or create your own analysis using our Key Indicators Database.

Global Opinion of Obama Slips, International Policies Faulted

Drone Strikes Widely Opposed

Among the principal findings from a survey of more than 26,000 people in 21 countries conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project:   

Global approval of President Barack Obama’s international policies has declined significantly since he first took office, but overall confidence in him and attitudes toward the U.S. have slipped only modestly as a consequence, finds a new survey just released today of 21 countries by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project.

Key findings:

  • President Obama:  Europeans and Japanese remain largely confident in Obama, while Muslim publics remain largely critical.
  • Obama and Bush:  Obama consistently receives higher ratings than President Bush did in 2008, in Western Europe and Japan, but also in several predominantly Muslim nations.
  • Obama’s Policies:  Among the EU countries surveyed in both 2009 and 2012, a median of 78% approved of Obama’s policies in 2009, compared with 63% now. 
  • Obama’s Re-election:   Among the EU countries surveyed in both 2009 and 2012, a median of 78% approved of Obama’s policies in 2009, compared with 63% now.  In the Middle East there is little enthusiasm for a second term. 
  • United States:  Majorities or pluralities in 12 countries express a favorable opinion of the U.S., while the prevailing view is negative in only five nations.  The biggest improvements in America’s image have occurred among Europeans, but not in strategically important Muslim nations. 
  • China:  Today, only 36% say the U.S. is the world’s leading economic power, while 42% believe China is in the top position.  
Read the report or create your own analysis using our Key Indicators Database.