59% of Americans have a favorable view of France, much improved after tensions over Iraq in 2003.

59% of Americans have a favorable view of France, much improved after tensions over Iraq in 2003.

In our recent survey, four countries in the Middle East-North Africa region had social hostility scores that rose by two or more points this year: Libya (whose score rose from 1.9 in 2011 to 5.4 in 2012), Tunisia (3.5 to 6.8), Syria (5.8 to 8.8) and Lebanon (5.6 to 7.9).

In our recent survey, four countries in the Middle East-North Africa region had social hostility scores that rose by two or more points this year: Libya (whose score rose from 1.9 in 2011 to 5.4 in 2012), Tunisia (3.5 to 6.8), Syria (5.8 to 8.8) and Lebanon (5.6 to 7.9).

Just 47% of the French say it is morally unacceptable for married people to have an affair, the lowest percentage among 39 nations we surveyed in 2013. 
There is broad acceptance of homosexuality in North America, the E.U., and much of Latin America. However, rejection of homosexuality is equally widespread in predominantly Muslim nations and in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as in parts of Asia and in Russia. Read more.

There is broad acceptance of homosexuality in North America, the E.U., and much of Latin America. However, rejection of homosexuality is equally widespread in predominantly Muslim nations and in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as in parts of Asia and in Russia. Read more.

Our new report on migration around the world is out.

A rising share of international migrants now lives in today’s high-income countries such as the United States and Germany, while a growing share was born in today’s middle-income nations such as India and Mexico, the analysis finds.

Our new report on migration around the world is out.

A rising share of international migrants now lives in today’s high-income countries such as the United States and Germany, while a growing share was born in today’s middle-income nations such as India and Mexico, the analysis finds.

Both the U.S. and China get mixed reviews when publics in the region are asked how much each country considers the interests of their own nation, although, on balance, China fares somewhat better on this measure.

Both the U.S. and China get mixed reviews when publics in the region are asked how much each country considers the interests of their own nation, although, on balance, China fares somewhat better on this measure.

Check out this teaser trailer for a TEDx Talk with Brian Grim, senior researcher at the Pew Research Forum on Religion & Public Life. 

Brian is an expert on religious restrictions and freedom around the world.

"Japan was the only nation among the 20 polled where a majority (58 percent) said it is good that American customs and ideas are spreading to their country. In contrast, less than a third in Britain, France, Spain, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Greece described the spread of U.S. ideas and customs as a good thing. In Egypt, Jordan, Turkey and Pakistan the numbers were even lower."

Richard Wike: American Star Power Still Rules the Globe

Are you watching the Academy Awards? Data from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project shows that movies – and more broadly, American popular culture – are a strong suit of U.S. soft power, but opinions vary from country to country.

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

A rising tide of restrictions on religion spread across the world between mid-2009 and mid-2010, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life. Restrictions on religion rose in each of the five major regions of the world – including in the Americas and sub-Saharan Africa, the two regions where overall restrictions previously had been declining.

The share of countries with high or very high restrictions on religious beliefs and practices rose from 31% in the year ending in mid-2009 to 37% in the year ending in mid-2010. Because some of the most restrictive countries are very populous, three-quarters of the world’s approximately 7 billion people live in countries with high government restrictions on religion or high social hostilities involving religion, up from 70% a year earlier.

Restrictions on religion rose not only in countries that began the year with high or very high restrictions or hostilities, such as Indonesia and Nigeria, but also in many countries that began with low or moderate restrictions or hostilities, such as Switzerland and the United States.

"The economic euphoria in India over the last few years, inspired by the country’s seemingly inevitable march toward double-digit growth, has suddenly soured. Although still relatively upbeat compared with many other countries, the Indian public’s confidence in their country’s direction and future economic growth has declined significantly compared with just a year ago. In a world where the Americans, the Europeans and even the Chinese have reason to worry about their economies, it is the Indians who have lost the greatest faith in their economic fortunes."

— From “Deepening Economic Doubts in India”, a new report by the Pew Global Attitudes Project

Belief that people are better off in a free market, even if some are rich and some are poor, is a casualty of the Great Recession. Faith in capitalism has fallen since 2007, especially in Europe and Muslim majority countries. 

Belief that people are better off in a free market, even if some are rich and some are poor, is a casualty of the Great Recession. Faith in capitalism has fallen since 2007, especially in Europe and Muslim majority countries. 

(Source: pewglobal.org)

Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S. - 74% Call America an Enemy
Key Findings from Pew Global:
As many as 74% of Pakistanis consider the U.S. an enemy
President Obama held in exceedingly low regard; Pakistan only country where ratings for Obama are no better than President George W. Bush received during his final year in office
Only 13% of Pakistanis think relations with the U.S. have improved in recent years
Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups
For the full report, including views of national leaders, extremism, India, visit http://pewrsr.ch/OsZBBV

Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S. - 74% Call America an Enemy

Key Findings from Pew Global:

  • As many as 74% of Pakistanis consider the U.S. an enemy
  • President Obama held in exceedingly low regard; Pakistan only country where ratings for Obama are no better than President George W. Bush received during his final year in office
  • Only 13% of Pakistanis think relations with the U.S. have improved in recent years
  • Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups

For the full report, including views of national leaders, extremism, India, visit http://pewrsr.ch/OsZBBV

"

In the past decade, anti-Americanism grew around the world. This was in response to concerns about the unchecked global power of the U.S., when it invaded Iraq in the face of very wide international opposition. In sharp contrast, today America is seen as on its way to losing its status as the dominant global superpower.

…[I]n 15 of 22 nations surveyed most say that China either will replace or already has replaced America as the world’s ‘leading superpower.’ This view is especially widespread in Western Europe, where at least six in 10 respondents in Britain, France, Germany and Spain see China eventually overtaking the U.S.

"

— Pew Research Center President Andrew Kohut in today’s Wall Street Journal, writing about a new Pew Global Attitudes survey report