"In 2009, Fox surpassed CNN as the cable news outlet that spends the most money each year. In 2012, the channel was estimated by SNL Kagan to spend $820 million—on everything from salaries for on-air talent to maintaining bureaus and keeping the lights on. That spending was up 11% from 2011 levels, according to Kagan data. CNN was estimated to spend $682 million on news gathering in 2012, and MSNBC, which draws partially upon the resources of parent NBC News, $240 million."

5 Facts about Fox News

"60% of Fox News viewers describe themselves as conservative, compared with 23% who say they are moderate and 10% who are liberal. By contrast, the ideological makeup of CNN viewers (32% conservative, 30% moderate, 30% liberal) and MSNBC viewers (32% conservative, 23% moderate, 36% liberal) is far more mixed."

5 Facts About Fox News

New: Nearly one-in-ten U.S. adults (8%) get news through Twitter. 
Who uses Facebook for news?

 

New report: How Americans Get TV News at Home
65% of Americans say news organizations focus on unimportant stories rather than on important ones (28%).

See more fast facts from Pew Research.

65% of Americans say news organizations focus on unimportant stories rather than on important ones (28%).

See more fast facts from Pew Research.

Can you identify this man? 77% of Americans can.

Test your News IQ knowledge in our quiz.

Our hot-off-the-presses report looks at views of China and the U.S. in 39 countries around the world. See how different countries view China and the U.S. and how China-U.S. relations are changing, including the following findings:
In 23 of 39 nations polled, majorities or pluralities say China either already has replaced or eventually will replace the U.S. as the top superpower. 
 In 28 of 38 nations, half or more of those surveyed express a favorable opinion of the U.S.
The highest favorability rating for the U.S. is in the Philippines, (85%), the lowest is Pakistan (11%).

Our hot-off-the-presses report looks at views of China and the U.S. in 39 countries around the world. See how different countries view China and the U.S. and how China-U.S. relations are changing, including the following findings:

  • In 23 of 39 nations polled, majorities or pluralities say China either already has replaced or eventually will replace the U.S. as the top superpower. 
  •  In 28 of 38 nations, half or more of those surveyed express a favorable opinion of the U.S.
  • The highest favorability rating for the U.S. is in the Philippines, (85%), the lowest is Pakistan (11%).
Anxiously awaiting news of the birth of the royal baby? Most Americans say they do not follow news of the British royal family, according to polls we’ve conducted dating back to 1986. However, interest in the royal baby news varies by age. Stay tuned - we’ll be back in the field this weekend tracking public interest in the expected birth of the royal baby this weekend. 

Anxiously awaiting news of the birth of the royal baby? Most Americans say they do not follow news of the British royal family, according to polls we’ve conducted dating back to 1986. However, interest in the royal baby news varies by age. 

Stay tuned - we’ll be back in the field this weekend tracking public interest in the expected birth of the royal baby this weekend. 

Do you listen to news on the radio?
Our latest poll finds most support for fracking in the Midwest and South, the least support in the West and Northeast.

Our latest poll finds most support for fracking in the Midwest and South, the least support in the West and Northeast.

From The Changing TV News Landscape, a chapter in our recent State of the News Media report.

In the last presidential campaign, journalists were responsible for only 27% of the information that voters heard about the candidates — while nearly 50% came from the politicians themselves.

Who runs the news cycle? Who controls the flow of information? Watch this video for a 5-minut explanation of how the role of the press has changed.