"Until aid from the IMF or greater trade with India arrives, the people of Pakistan remain extremely downbeat about their economic plight. Roughly nine in 10 say the economy is bad, including a majority (64 per cent) that thinks it is very bad, according to the 2012 Pew Global Attitudes survey. Just nine per cent rate the economy positively."

— Bruce Stokes, "Seeds of Unrest in Pakistan’s Economy"

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

As China is projecting its power abroad and preparing for a change of leadership at home, the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project asked the Chinese public what it thought of other countries, especially its neighbors.  They also asked people in a number of other countries what they thought of China.  These are some of the findings.  

The Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project has a new report out today, “Deepening Economic Doubts in India.”
In addition to providing new analysis on Indian attitudes, values and views on relationships with other nations, the report also finds that majorities in India and Pakistan support improved relations, as per the chart above.
Click here for the full report. 

The Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project has a new report out today, “Deepening Economic Doubts in India.”

In addition to providing new analysis on Indian attitudes, values and views on relationships with other nations, the report also finds that majorities in India and Pakistan support improved relations, as per the chart above.

Click here for the full report. 

    "Some argued it was gone long ago, and India’s growth figures certainly suggested as much: India Shining is a thing of a past, a narrative that no longer strikes a chord with the majority of the country’s population."

    — The Wall Street Journal, “Goodbye, India Shining,” Sept. 10, 2012

    The Wall Street Journal reports on new research from the Pew Global Attitudes Project. According to the report, Deepening Economic Doubts in India,” the Indian public’s confidence in their country’s direction and future economic growth has declined significantly compared with just a year ago. In a world where the Americans, the Europeans and even the Chinese have reason to worry about their economies, it is the Indians who have lost the greatest faith in their economic fortunes. 

    Click here for the complete report.

    Most Muslims Want Democracy, Personal Freedoms and Islam in Political Life; Few Believe U.S. Backs Democracy
More than a year after the first stirrings of the Arab Spring, there continues to be a strong desire for democracy in Arab and other predominantly Muslim nations, finds a just released survey by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project.
Solid majorities in Lebanon, Turkey, Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan believe democracy is the best form of government, as do a plurality of Pakistanis. These publics do not just support the general notion of democracy – they also embrace specific features of a democratic system, such as competitive elections and free speech. 
A substantial number in key Muslim countries want a large role for Islam in political life. However, there are significant differences over the degree to which the legal system should be based on Islam.
The United States is not seen as promoting democracy in the Middle East. In newly democratic Tunisia, only about three-in-ten believe the American response to the political upheaval in their country has had a positive impact.
Despite the tumult and uncertainty of the last year, views about democracy are mostly unchanged since 2011, although support has declined somewhat in Jordan. Enthusiasm for democracy tends to be generally less intense in Jordan and in Pakistan. It is consistently strong in Lebanon and Turkey.
The survey, conducted in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Tunisia and Turkey from March 19 to April 20, also finds:
Economic Concerns: While democratic rights and institutions are popular, they are not the only priorities. In particular, the economy is a top concern; most would rather have a strong economy than a good democracy.  
Role of Islam: Majorities in Pakistan, Jordan and Egypt believe laws should strictly follow the teachings of the Quran, while most Tunisians and 44% of Turks want laws to be influenced by the values and principles of Islam, but not strictly follow the Quran.
 Gender Equality: Majorities in all six nations surveyed believe women should have equal rights as men, and more than eight-in-ten hold this view in Lebanon and Turkey. In Egypt, a slimmer majority (58%) favors equal rights, while 36% oppose the idea. Moreover, while many in the six nations surveyed support the general principle of gender equality, there is less enthusiasm for gender parity in politics, economics and family life.
Extremist Groups: Extremist groups are largely rejected in predominantly Muslim nations, although significant numbers do express support for radical groups in several countries. While there is no country in which a majority holds a favorable opinion of Hamas, it receives considerable support in Tunisia, Jordan and Egypt. 
Iran and Syria: On balance, opinions about Iran are negative, although Pakistan is a clear exception – 76% of Pakistanis have a favorable view of Iran, and 47% rate President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad positively. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad generally receives very negative ratings. 
Read the report:  http://pewrsr.ch/NjksFx

    Most Muslims Want Democracy, Personal Freedoms and Islam in Political Life; Few Believe U.S. Backs Democracy

    More than a year after the first stirrings of the Arab Spring, there continues to be a strong desire for democracy in Arab and other predominantly Muslim nations, finds a just released survey by the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project.

    Solid majorities in Lebanon, Turkey, Egypt, Tunisia and Jordan believe democracy is the best form of government, as do a plurality of Pakistanis. These publics do not just support the general notion of democracy – they also embrace specific features of a democratic system, such as competitive elections and free speech. 

    A substantial number in key Muslim countries want a large role for Islam in political life. However, there are significant differences over the degree to which the legal system should be based on Islam.

    The United States is not seen as promoting democracy in the Middle East. In newly democratic Tunisia, only about three-in-ten believe the American response to the political upheaval in their country has had a positive impact.

    Despite the tumult and uncertainty of the last year, views about democracy are mostly unchanged since 2011, although support has declined somewhat in Jordan. Enthusiasm for democracy tends to be generally less intense in Jordan and in Pakistan. It is consistently strong in Lebanon and Turkey.

    The survey, conducted in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, Tunisia and Turkey from March 19 to April 20, also finds:

    • Economic Concerns: While democratic rights and institutions are popular, they are not the only priorities. In particular, the economy is a top concern; most would rather have a strong economy than a good democracy.  
    • Role of Islam: Majorities in Pakistan, Jordan and Egypt believe laws should strictly follow the teachings of the Quran, while most Tunisians and 44% of Turks want laws to be influenced by the values and principles of Islam, but not strictly follow the Quran.
    •  Gender Equality: Majorities in all six nations surveyed believe women should have equal rights as men, and more than eight-in-ten hold this view in Lebanon and Turkey. In Egypt, a slimmer majority (58%) favors equal rights, while 36% oppose the idea. Moreover, while many in the six nations surveyed support the general principle of gender equality, there is less enthusiasm for gender parity in politics, economics and family life.
    • Extremist Groups: Extremist groups are largely rejected in predominantly Muslim nations, although significant numbers do express support for radical groups in several countries. While there is no country in which a majority holds a favorable opinion of Hamas, it receives considerable support in Tunisia, Jordan and Egypt. 
    • Iran and Syria: On balance, opinions about Iran are negative, although Pakistan is a clear exception – 76% of Pakistanis have a favorable view of Iran, and 47% rate President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad positively. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad generally receives very negative ratings. 
    Read the report:  http://pewrsr.ch/NjksFx
    Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S. - 74% Call America an Enemy
Key Findings from Pew Global:
As many as 74% of Pakistanis consider the U.S. an enemy
President Obama held in exceedingly low regard; Pakistan only country where ratings for Obama are no better than President George W. Bush received during his final year in office
Only 13% of Pakistanis think relations with the U.S. have improved in recent years
Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups
For the full report, including views of national leaders, extremism, India, visit http://pewrsr.ch/OsZBBV

    Pakistani Public Opinion Ever More Critical of U.S. - 74% Call America an Enemy

    Key Findings from Pew Global:

    • As many as 74% of Pakistanis consider the U.S. an enemy
    • President Obama held in exceedingly low regard; Pakistan only country where ratings for Obama are no better than President George W. Bush received during his final year in office
    • Only 13% of Pakistanis think relations with the U.S. have improved in recent years
    • Pakistanis have become less willing to work with the U.S. on efforts to combat extremist groups

    For the full report, including views of national leaders, extremism, India, visit http://pewrsr.ch/OsZBBV