Harvard poll finds Millennials have turned sour on Obama
For the first time in surveys dating back nearly 40 years, a majority (53%) says the United States plays a less important and powerful role as a world leader than it did a decade ago. The share saying the U.S. is less powerful has increased 12 points since 2009 and has more than doubled – from just 20% – since 2004.

For the first time in surveys dating back nearly 40 years, a majority (53%) says the United States plays a less important and powerful role as a world leader than it did a decade ago. The share saying the U.S. is less powerful has increased 12 points since 2009 and has more than doubled – from just 20% – since 2004.

The latest national poll by the Pew Research Center, conducted Oct. 30-Nov. 6 among 2,003 adults, finds that Obama’s second-term job ratings have followed a similar downward trajectory as those of his predecessor, George W. Bush. A year after his reelection, 36% approved of Bush’s job performance, down from 48% in December 2004.

The latest national poll by the Pew Research Center, conducted Oct. 30-Nov. 6 among 2,003 adults, finds that Obama’s second-term job ratings have followed a similar downward trajectory as those of his predecessor, George W. Bush. A year after his reelection, 36% approved of Bush’s job performance, down from 48% in December 2004.

"One clear troubling sign for the Democrats at this early stage is independent voters, who decide most elections. They are evenly divided, according to Pew’s mid-October survey: 43% say that “if the elections for Congress were being held today,” they would vote for the Republican candidate in their district, 43% say they would vote for the Democratic candidate."

— Andy Kohut, founding director of the Pew Research Center, in the WSJ: The GOP Is in Better Shape Than You Think

An examination of the 2012 election results shows just how few House races were at all close. Out of 435 seats total, in only 62 (14.3%) were the winner and runner-up separated by fewer than 10 percentage points. Democrats won 32 of those “close-ish” contests, Republicans 30.

An examination of the 2012 election results shows just how few House races were at all close. Out of 435 seats total, in only 62 (14.3%) were the winner and runner-up separated by fewer than 10 percentage points. Democrats won 32 of those “close-ish” contests, Republicans 30.

Public concern over breaching the debt limit deadline has risen only slightly from a week ago. Among those who see no dire economic consequences from missing the Thursday deadline, most say there is no need to raise the debt limit at all.

Public concern over breaching the debt limit deadline has risen only slightly from a week ago. Among those who see no dire economic consequences from missing the Thursday deadline, most say there is no need to raise the debt limit at all.

Who’s angry at the government today?
More express concern over civil liberties (47%) than protection from terrorism (35%) for the first time in Pew Research Center polling.

More express concern over civil liberties (47%) than protection from terrorism (35%) for the first time in Pew Research Center polling.

Currently, 43% approve of the way that Barack Obama is handling the economy, while 52% disapprove. Obama’s job rating on the economy has shown little change this year. Views of Obama’s handling of the economy have been consistently more negative than positive since shortly after he took office in early 2009.

Currently, 43% approve of the way that Barack Obama is handling the economy, while 52% disapprove. Obama’s job rating on the economy has shown little change this year. Views of Obama’s handling of the economy have been consistently more negative than positive since shortly after he took office in early 2009.

The belief that the U.S. economic system is no more secure today than it was before the financial crisis is widely shared across demographic groups. There are partisan differences, however, with Democrats more likely than Republicans or independents to say that the system is more secure.
Large majorities of Republicans (80%) and independents (68%) say the economic system is not more secure than prior to the financial crisis. Democrats are divided: 51% say the system is more secure today while 45% say it is not.
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The belief that the U.S. economic system is no more secure today than it was before the financial crisis is widely shared across demographic groups. There are partisan differences, however, with Democrats more likely than Republicans or independents to say that the system is more secure.

Large majorities of Republicans (80%) and independents (68%) say the economic system is not more secure than prior to the financial crisis. Democrats are divided: 51% say the system is more secure today while 45% say it is not.

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Currently, 53% disapprove of the health care law, while 42% approve. This is among the most negative assessments of the law since it was enacted in March 2010. In July 2012, shortly after the Supreme Court upheld most of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, 47% approved of the legislation and 43% disapproved.

Currently, 53% disapprove of the health care law, while 42% approve. This is among the most negative assessments of the law since it was enacted in March 2010. In July 2012, shortly after the Supreme Court upheld most of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, 47% approved of the legislation and 43% disapproved.

Americans generally are less willing to support foreign policies on moral or humanitarian grounds than when they are cast as directly benefiting the United States or its allies.
In February, when Gallup asked Americans how important various foreign-policy goals should be, 52% rated promoting and defending human rights in other countries as “very important.” Out of nine goals Gallup asked about, it ranked third from the bottom, ahead of “helping other countries build democracies” and “promoting economic development in other countries” (31% each). By far the strongest support — above 80% in each case — was given to goals related to U.S. national security and securing adequate energy supplies for the country.
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Americans generally are less willing to support foreign policies on moral or humanitarian grounds than when they are cast as directly benefiting the United States or its allies.

In February, when Gallup asked Americans how important various foreign-policy goals should be, 52% rated promoting and defending human rights in other countries as “very important.” Out of nine goals Gallup asked about, it ranked third from the bottom, ahead of “helping other countries build democracies” and “promoting economic development in other countries” (31% each). By far the strongest support — above 80% in each case — was given to goals related to U.S. national security and securing adequate energy supplies for the country.

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Over just the past week, the share of Americans who oppose U.S. airstrikes in Syria has surged 15 points, from 48% to 63%, as many who were undecided about the issue have turned against military action. By contrast, the share of Americans who support airstrikes remains virtually unchanged: Just 28% favor U.S. military airstrikes against Syria in response to reports that its government used chemical weapons. Read more.

Over just the past week, the share of Americans who oppose U.S. airstrikes in Syria has surged 15 points, from 48% to 63%, as many who were undecided about the issue have turned against military action. By contrast, the share of Americans who support airstrikes remains virtually unchanged: Just 28% favor U.S. military airstrikes against Syria in response to reports that its government used chemical weapons. Read more.

Partisan polarization, in Congress and among public, is greater than ever.

Partisan polarization, in Congress and among public, is greater than ever.

As they attempt political comebacks, Eliot Spitzer, Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford all are hoping they can put behind them the headlines about the misdeeds that forced them from office. And, those headlines were numerous: the amount of news coverage their misdeeds attracted ranked among the top five political scandals of recent years.

As they attempt political comebacks, Eliot Spitzer, Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford all are hoping they can put behind them the headlines about the misdeeds that forced them from office. And, those headlines were numerous: the amount of news coverage their misdeeds attracted ranked among the top five political scandals of recent years.